News

2016 ASLA Design Symposium Recap

The annual ASLA Oregon Symposium was once again a huge success!

The Symposium kicked off bright and early Saturday morning. Landscape architects, designers and allied professionals filed into University of Oregon’s White Stag Block abuzz with discussion about the day ahead.

Each speaker presented a wonderfully different perspective on the topic of fostering equity and diversity in design, our communities, our profession. How do we bridge practice to help create equitable and resilient communities? Attendees explored sustainability as an anti-poverty strategy, intercultural modes for inclusive urban spaces, cultural changes and rapid urban growth occurring in cities of Mexico. We learned more about how diversity and environmental justice in design can be achieved with strong community collaboration.

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Our gracious sponsors had tables set up in the middle of our gathering space, making it easy for attendees to get the latest product news and information, as well as food and drink. We hear year after year from our members how much they enjoy reconnecting with their local plant nurseries, site furnishing manufacturers, and more!
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An engaging keynote address was given by Diane Jones Allen, Design Jones LLC,  that explored bridging community practice and academy to create equitable and resilient environments. The sessions to follow were lively, educational and cross disciplinary in nature – exactly the balance the Symposium planning committee strives for every year. We wrapped up the day with a compelling panel moderated by Randy Gragg, Executive Director John Yeon Center for Architecture and the Landscape, University of Oregon.

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Thank you attendees, sponsors and volunteers for your participation again this year! A special thanks to the John Yeon Center and Randy Gragg for hosting the event. Everyone’s energy and enthusiasm helped make this annual event a success yet again. See you next year!

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RFP – City of Eugene Placemaking Consultant

CITY OF EUGENE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

RFP #2016200081

Notice to Proposers

Pursuant to ORS 279B.060 and City of Eugene Administrative Order 44-14-08F, Public Contracting Rule (City Rule) 137-047-0260, sealed proposals for a Placemaking Consultant for the City of Eugene will be accepted by the Purchasing Office, 100 West 10th Avenue, Suite 400, Eugene, Oregon 97401 until 2:30pm PDT, May 20, 2016.  Proposals will be opened immediately thereafter and a record of proposals received will be made.  Proposals will not be accepted after the Request for Proposals (RFP) closing time and date.  Proposals shall be valid for 120 days after opening unless otherwise specified in the specifications.  This Request for Proposals does not commit the City to pay any costs incurred by any proposer in the submission of a proposal.

 

Project Description

In general, the City of Eugene (City) is requesting proposals from Placemaking Consultants to engage the community and prepare a Placemaking Plan for the City’s downtown public spaces. In order to facilitate a consistent execution of the vision and concept completed in this scope of work, it is preferred that the consultant continue to be available for additional coordination and review of future phases of work.

 

Solicitation Documents

Solicitation documents may be examined at the City of Eugene Purchasing Office, 100 West 10th Avenue, Suite 400, Eugene, Oregon 97401 or electronically by logging in to the City’s eBid system at www.eugene-or.gov/purchasing.

A paper copy of the Solicitation may be obtained at the City’s Purchasing Office at 100 West 10th Avenue, Suite 400, Eugene, Oregon 97401.

Submittal

Proposers must submit an original proposal directly to the City’s Purchasing Office at 100 West 10th Avenue, Suite 400, Eugene, Oregon 97401 before the due date and time specified in the RFP. Proposers shall make the proposal available to the City for download via email, FTP site, or other means. Proposers shall provide electronic copy or link via email to Becky Wheeler at the address indicated below.

Please contact me with questions about this opportunity.

Becky L. Wheeler, CPPB
Purchasing Analyst
City of Eugene|Finance
541-682-5056

 


World Landscape Architecture Month 2016

World Landscape Architecture Month is going on now. 

Every year during the month of April, countries across the globe focus on ways to highlight and promote our profession.  Sometimes this promotion takes the place as community events or lectures, but those events take a great deal of time to plan (something that is lacking in many lives).  For the second year, ASLA has harnessed the power of social media by setting up the hashtag #WLAM2016 and providing cards that read, “This is Landscape Architecture”.  People can take a picture that portrays landscape architecture (integrating the card somewhere in the image) then post the photo to social media avenues using #WLAM2016.

For inspiration, take a moment to look on the WLAM 2016 tagboard; see posts from Scotland, the Netherlands, Seattle, Chicago and more.  All these images express what people have found important in their profession.  This social media campaign gives people a chance to change how people view landscape architecture, showing a breadth of projects,  all designed by a landscape architect.

If you were wondering if it is worth the effort, consider this.  As of April 12, ASLA has counted 2,150 posts with #WLAM2016, all images of landscape architecture that reached 1,319,385 people.  Hard numbers that show this campaign is not only a powerful way to promote landscape architecture, it can be a powerful way to promote your business as well.  I would venture that most firms marketing programs don’t reach over a million people.

It’s April – get out there and celebrate.


UO Shadow Mentor Day Recap

Thank you so much for your support of this year’s Shadow Mentor Day! It was a huge success. We had a total of 62 student participants placed between 33 offices in Portland, Eugene, Bend, and Seattle. Thanks to the groundwork laid by Roni and last year’s student ASLA team, this year’s SMD is the largest that any involved can recall!

 

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Landscape Architects Connect with Professional Development

Professional development is a process of lifelong learning to gather new skills, to expand knowledge, and to support career advancement. Classes and workshops, webinars and lectures, tours and field work, teaching and mentoring, volunteering and networking are many of the ways that professional development occurs.

Continuing education requirements to maintain licensure are often the focus of a landscape architect’s professional development activities. Keeping current on new technologies, trends and products are critical to the practice of landscape architecture.

Oregon ASLA is committed to making continuing education available to our members and connecting landscape architects with opportunities locally and nationally, online and in person. Last year we reviewed and approved 31 workshops, lectures and events for PDH credits and promoted them in our monthly Newswire and on our website. And this spring, Oregon ASLA hopes to become the next ASLA chapter to become a Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES) certified provider. This will allow us to offer Professional Development Hour (PDH) credits at our chapter events that are recognized by many states across the U.S., including Oregon and Washington.

Looking for ways to expand your professional development and continuing education activities? Read more in our listings below.

Chapter and Local Events

Oregon ASLA’s annual Symposium and local section meetings are developed to meet continuing education requirements in the Oregon Administrative Rules administered by the Oregon State Landscape Architect Board (OSLAB).

Check the OR ASLA Events listings for opportunities throughout the state offering a range of continuing education activities. Programs and events offered by other organizations may qualify for PDH credits.

Get Involved!

Volunteering with ASLA or in the community provides opportunities for developing leadership skills, professional networking, and serving the profession. And in some instances, volunteer service qualifies for PDH credit. Serving as an elected officer or appointed member of a professional board or commission may qualify for up to 4 PDHs per year. Mentoring one or more students for one day on Shadow Mentor Day may be eligible for up to 1 PDH.

Oregon ASLA always welcomes volunteers to assist with events, committees and programs. And every summer, our annual Call for Nominations seeks out members who are interested serving on the chapter’s Executive Committee. Contact us to learn more and sign up.

ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO

The ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO offers over 135 courses, allowing attendees to earn up to 21 PDHs. This year’s will be held in New Orleans from October 21-24. The conference theme and education sessions will be announced later this year.

Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES)

ASLA’s Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES) provides listings of professional development and continuing education programs for landscape architects. Programs offered by more than 130 LA CES certified providers are recognized by OSLAB for PDH credits. Look for Oregon ASLA to be added to this list of certified providers later this spring.

ASLA Online Learning

ASLA also offers Online Learning programs and the Landscape Architecture Technical Information Series (LATIS) which qualify for PDH credit. Either by participating in a live webinar, watching a recorded online presentation, or reading one of 11 peer-reviewed papers, you can earn up to 5.0 PDHs. Looking for a more affordable option for getting PDH credits? ASLA members can participate in these programs at a reduced rate.

Helpful Links


One-day Fee Proposal Workshop for Design Professionals

On the 19th February, two internationally renowned fee proposal experts will be delivering the One-day Fee Proposal Workshop in Oregon.

Attendees will learn how to write proposals that; increase fee levels, raise conversion rates and avoid scope creep.

  • 85% of attendees say it’s the most useful ConEd course they’ve attended
  • 99% of attendees say they would recommend the Workshop to other design professionals
  • Maximum of 16 attendees per venue

ASLA members our eligible for a 10% discount. Please use promotional code: ASLA

F8 AIA Learning Units, 0.8 IDCEC ConEd Units

Learn more: http://blueturtlemc.com/USA-workshops

Please contact Emily with any questions you may have: Emily@blueturtlemc.com or 855-661-4270

 


Oregon ASLA Brings Focus, Inspiration to Trail Design Workshop

A team of sixteen members of Oregon ASLA, joined by nine members of the Student Chapter of ASLA at the University of Oregon, gathered in Carlton, Oregon on November 13th and 14th for a design workshop for the Yamhelas Westsider Trail, a proposed multimodal transportation corridor in Yamhill County.

Over 50 local residents, business owners, elected officials and agency staff worked directly with the Oregon/UO ASLA team to develop conceptual plans that will guide the future development of the trail. The team solicited input to develop design ideas for elements of the trail including trailheads, wayfinding signage, property access, and connections to key destinations. The workshop concluded with an public open house for the landscape architects to present their design proposals and solicit feedback from the larger community.

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Yamhill County and the non-profit organization, Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail, are leading efforts to develop the trail. The design workshop was part of a collaborative planning process funded through a technical assistance grant from the National Parks Service’s Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program (NPS RTCA). Carlton-based winery Ken Wright Cellars hosted the workshop and their barrel room provided an inspiring backdrop for our work.

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About the Yamhelas Westsider Trail

The 17-mile long railroad corridor is located in the heart of Oregon’s wine country and provides a link between four cities, two counties and several regionally significant recreation sites, including Henry Hagg Lake and Wapato Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Yamhill County has been actively working with the Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail, citizens, local businesses and partner agencies including the Cities of Carlton, Yamhill, McMinnville, and Gaston, Washington County, and Oregon Parks and Recreation on the proposed acquisition of the abandoned Union Pacific Railroad right of way from Hagg Lake to OR 99W, near McMinnville.

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“The trail will provide a safe, off-street facility for people walking and biking to work, students attending Yamhill-Carlton High School, recreational cyclists and for other local trips in Carlton and Yamhill,” said Yamhill County Commissioner Stan Primozich. “This is a needed investment that has the ability to transform our community.”

The first phase of the project will acquire up to 9 miles of the railroad right-of-way using $1.7 million of Federal Transportation Enhancement funds through a grant from the Oregon Department of Transportation. The acquisition would preserve the rail corridor in one single public ownership. Yamhill County and the Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail are actively pursuing additional grant funds to develop the alignment, creating the first regional alternative transportation corridor in the Yamhill Valley.

NPS RTCA Partnership Brings Opportunities

Oregon ASLA participated in the workshop under ASLA’s partnership with NPS RTCA to help communities plan, design and manage their natural, cultural and recreational resources.

Since 2000, ASLA chapters across the country and NPS RTCA have worked together to support dozens of community-led natural resource conservation and recreation projects. This unique partnership, first tested in the Pacific Northwest, expanded opportunities for ASLA chapters and National Park Service staff across the county.

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What’s next?

NPS RTCA staff will work with Yamhill County and the Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail to assemble the drawings and information into a concept plan document that will be published in 2016.

“Community leaders from Yamhill County have led the development of this project over several decades and provided the necessary support to secure the federal transportation funds to acquire the rail property,” said Wayne Wiebke with the Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail. “We are excited to be where we are today, developing ideas to guide the design of this future trail.”


Yamhelas Westsider Trail Design Workshop

November 13-14, 2015, Carlton, Oregon

Oregon ASLA: Elizabeth Auvil (Alta Planning + Design), Brian Bainnson (Quatrefoil), Tim Bono (Walker Macy), Arica Duhrkoop-Galas (The Office of Stangeland and Associates; University of Oregon), Gregg Everhart (Parametrix; Everhart LA, LLC), Kate Forester (Herrera Environmental Consultants), Tamra Lehuta (Meier Architecture + Engineering), Aaron Maples (Walker Macy), Arjen Meeuswen (PLACE), Maureen Raad (ESA Vigil Agrimis), Sterling Rung (PLACE), Jean Senechal Biggs (Portland Bureau of Transportation), Shannon Simms (Mayer Reed), Pam Symond (City of Eugene), Robin Wilcox (PLACE), and Alex Zatarain (Stemmler Design).

UO Student Chapter ASLA: Kayla Byrne, Casey Howard, Alison Lewis, John Maxson, Krisztian Megyeri, Peter Obermeyer, Keegan Oneal, Nancy Pierce, and Callan Roemer.

NPS RTCA: Dan Miller and Shawn James

Yamhill County: Jayne Mercer and Brett Henry

Friends of Yamhelas Westsider Trail

Special thanks to our hosts, Ken Wright Cellars.


LOOP PDX: A Juried Competition

Make an impact on the future of the city by bringing to life Portland’s proposed Green Loop, a six-mile pedestrian/bike urban promenade linking the city’s east and west sides.
Finalists will present during Design Week Portland in April and the winning proposal will receive up to $20,000 for further development.
Proposals are due February 29, but you must register by January 22.

Shifting Sands: Sedimentary Cycles for Jamaica Bay

01.11.16 @5:30pm | Fuller Lecture: Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA

Shifting Sands is a framework for enhancing coastal resiliency at Jamaica Bay, New York, a location highly impacted by the 2012 landfall of Hurricane Sandy. The proposal includes novel design strategies for marsh island restoration and enhanced sediment delivery, merging ecosystem restoration with coastal storm risk management strategies for the Rockaway Peninsula and the back-bay communities. Assessing social, environmental, and infrastructural vulnerabilities, the plan embraces the vast scale and fetch dimension of Jamaica Bay and explores the role of natural and nature-based features within the urban context of this estuarine embayment. 

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA     

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Catherine Seavitt Nordenson is an Associate Professor at the City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research focuses on design adaptation to sea level rise in urban coastal environments and explores novel landscape restoration practices given the dynamics of climate change. Seavitt co-authored the book On the Water: Palisade Bay, a climate adaptation proposal for New York’s Upper Harbor; this study was the foundation of the 2010 exhibition “Rising Currents” at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Seavitt is currently leading research at Jamaica Bay as part of Structures of Coastal Resilience (SCR), a project supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Lecture has been reviewed and approved by the Oregon Chapter of ASLA for 1.0 Health, Safety and Welfare PDH for Oregon Registered Landscape Architects.

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